The Medieval Shoppe
0 actions
+ expand
View more images (9)
Leaf-Blade Renaissance Dagger High Quality Leather Scabbard Overall Length: 44.5cm Blade Length: 31cm Blade Width: 4.8 cm (at widest point) EN 45 Steel Full Tang 0.72 Kg Sharp The leaf-shaped blade was common in the Classical era -mainly amongst the Greeks and Celts. Although this blade form produces a powerful chop, when set against plate armour or mail, a narrower more-tapered blade was found to be more effective when thrust. Ancient shortcomings in metallurgy (producing iron rather than steel) also influenced the design -with shorter and wider blades being less prone to bending out of shape. In the Renaissance, Ancient Greek philosophy and art was once more held in high esteem. As a result, arms and armour began to reflect the Classical era too (to a degree). In this new intellectual climate where Alle romana et alla antica ("in the manner of the Romans and the ancients") was the new way forward, the leaf-blade would put in a new appearance, albeit to a limited extent. Yes, these Classically influenced blades were fashion statements brandished by the moneyed classes and were never seriously reintroduced to the European battlefield -but they were fully functional weapons, that caused wide stabbing wounds and powerful cuts -as many a 16th century transgressor or ruffian found out to his cost.

0 actions
+ expand
View larger image
Suitable for use with many period outfits, this authentically-tailored shirt features a cord-tie neck with crisscross ties on the arms through metal grommets.

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (4)
 
.

A very accurate well-made replica. You will be delighted with this holster: with its thick (hard shell) leather it weighs almost half a kilo. It even has a Reich's Bureau number stamped upon it, such is the attention to detail. lts dimensions are as per the original, and as such it will perfectly house a genuine Luger. Just like the originals, this holster is built to go through hell and back - so we offer a lifetime guarantee.
 


0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (2)
     
This cotton heraldic vertical banner (or "swallowtail gonfalon" if you prefer) is an ideal backdrop for exhibitions, theatrical events, film projects or medieval banquets. It's made of cotton, it has two faux gold-braid ties and the lion is sewn onto the flag rather than printed: adding to its authentic look. This banner is as large as you would expect it to be: 42cm x 86cm (excluding the strings). The imagery of a rampant lion was very common in medieval heraldry. Its popularity as a pan-European symbol of pride and power lives on today, as the symbol is still integral to the coats of arms of the Czech Republic, Bohemia, Finland, Leon, Netherlands, Norway, Scotland, Belgium, Bulgaria, Labourd, Soule, Alava and Macedonia. They also appear on the coats of arms of around 140 family names. Lions were rarely seen by medieval artists. Their main sources of inspiration were exaggerated descriptions, which they dutifully worked from to produce their art. Hence typical heraldic lions are half mythical in nature: with spikey manes, serpent-like tongues, huge protruding spike-like claws and forked tails.

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (3)
   
Cotton Late Medieval or Renaissance shirt. King Louis IX of France (1214–1270), became the first king of France to regularly dress in blue. This was copied by other nobles. The coat of arms of the kings of France became an azure or light blue shield, sprinkled with golden lilies. Once blue became the colour of the king, it also became the colour of the wealthy and powerful in Europe. In the Middle Ages in France and to some extent in Italy, the dyeing of blue cloth was subject to license from the crown or state. In Italy, the dyeing of blue was assigned to a specific guild, the tintori di guado, and could not be done by anyone else without severe penalty. The wearing of blue implied some dignity and some wealth. While blue was an expensive and prestigious colour in European painting, it became a common colour for clothing during the Renaissance. The rise of the colour blue in fashion in the 12th and 13th centuries led to the creation of a thriving blue dye industry in several European cities. They made a dye called pastel from woad, a plant common in Europe, which had been used to make blue dye by the Celts and German tribes. Blue became a colour worn by domestics and artisans, not just nobles. In 1570, when Pope Pius V listed the colours that could be used for ecclesiastical dress and for altar decoration, he excluded blue, because he considered it too common! By the end of the Middle Ages woad began to be replaced by Indian indigo -and not before time: the process of making blue dye with woad was Read more

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (2)
     

U.S. M1916 Colt holster, officer’s belt and magazine pouch set.

High quality leather

Fully adjustable (will fit waist from 30 inches to 42 inches)  

 


0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (2)
     
. U.S. M1916 Colt holster, officer’s belt and magazine pouch set.

High quality leather
 

Fully adjustable
(will fit waist from 30 inches to 42 inches) .



 


0 actions
+ expand
View more images (9)
..

This sword was favoured by the Swiss Landsknechte in the Renaissance. Katzbalger means "cat skinner". It's not truly known why it was given this name -"katzbalger" is German slang for a brawler, so it may have been known as a "brawling sword". Some sources say that it was so agile and sharp, you could have skinned a cat with it -hence the name. Whatever the truth, it was a sturdy, wide-bladed and most devastating sword that technically transcended its late medieval forebears.

Fitted with the distinctive "figure 8" pattern guard, the overall feeling of the Katzbalger is one of overwhelming utility. This faithful and functional replica is a very solidly constructed piece that's meant for dirty business. If the user desires a sword which will fit into a variety of time periods or if you're looking for that "one and only" type of sword, the Katzbalger may not be it. On the other hand, if you desire a sword of this specific type with which to round out a collection or complete a persona look no further.

 

Measurements and Specifications:

Weight: 1.909 kg Overall length: 99.5 cm Blade length: 76cm Blade width: 5.6cm at base and tapering Grip length: 23cm (incl. pommel) Guard width: Read more

0 actions
+ expand
View larger images (5)
Suitable for use with many period outfits, this authentically-tailored shirt features a cord-tie neck with crisscross ties on the arms through metal grommets.

0 actions
+ expand
View larger image
Quick Overview: Weight: 2 Kilos. Circ: 75 cm. Height: 27cm. Nasal: 10.1 cm. 14 Gauge (heavy duty) Suspension Liner Chinstrap Generous Size – our competitors more often than not, don’t give the dimensions of their helmets. Ours has an outer circumference of 75 cm, and a width of 22.5 cm (internal width of 21.3cm) the length being 25.5 cm, this means that if you take a medium hat size (57), you can wear a regular arming cap and a chain mail coif beneath this helmet, if you take a large hat size (61 or over) you will still be able to wear a thinner style arming cap with this helmet or it will make a comfortable fit worn by itself and the nasal guard won’t be skinning your nose every time you put it on. Most Norman helmets on the market are around 68cm to 70cm outer circumference (or less). As per the historical example there is a secondary steel band around the crown of the head, giving an equivalent of eight gauge protection in that area. Background Initially nasal helmets were formed of four triangular pieces of metal plate riveted in a ring, secured by bands which met at the apex. This produced a good-looking helmet, but when it was concluded that all those bands and rivets gave an enemy’s blade something to catch into, it became outmoded. A smooth dome makes for a structurally stronger helmet with superior deflection. It would be wrong to say that riveted and banded helmets were quickly replaced, as they were still used well into the 14th century, but the advantages of a smooth helmet were too apparent Read more

themedievalshoppe
Share my photo blog
  • 2122
  • photos
  • 3
  • videos