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PROTECTOR OF THE RAJ!

NEPALI KHUKURI (KUKRI) GENUINE! -FROM THE HIMALAYAS

1.063 KG IN SHEATH -0.789 KG OUT OF SHEATH

49 CM LONG, EXCLUDING CURVATURE

SPINE (BACK OF BLADE) = 0.5 CM WIDE

BRASS-TIPPED SCABBARD WITH 2 BELT LOOPS WILL FIT ON ANY BELT UP TO 8CM WIDE

HAND FORGED -FULL TANG BLADE

MADE IN NEPAL

Far superior to any Kathmandu tourist shop souvenir, the weapon you see here is hand forged from a Himalayan workshop; made in the traditional manner for heavy duty tasks, -such as lopping off branches, slaughtering animals and (if need be) self defense. The design hasn't changed for centuries. What more can we say? It is the real McCoy: a functional battlefield quality weapon; a Himalayan survival tool from the shadow of Everest. After the Samurai sword, this is the most awesome bladed weapon to ever come out of Asia. Yours to own!

The internet is flooded with cheap MADE IN CHINA Kukris, most of which are “kukris” in name only, but only the genuine article will fill the gap in your collection. This is no wall hanger, it's solid and built Read more


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The history of the sword has given us many designs that are unique, and readily associated with a particular time, place, and culture. Even people who are unfamiliar with the subject will recognize a Scottish basket-hilt, a musketeer's rapier, or the Japanese samurai's katana. One of the most distinctive sword types extant has come to us from the period commonly called the Viking Age. This is a period recognized by scholars as being roughly from 750 A.D. to 1100 A.D. This was an evolutional period between the migration era and what we have come to know as the Middle Ages. The Viking Age saw the transition from composite hilts constructed of non-ferrous metals, and organic materials, to far stronger hilts fashioned from iron. The change from pattern-welded blades to homogenous blades, or those made from one type of steel, also occurred during this period. At the beginning of the Viking Age swords featured a pattern-welded blade that was mounted on a complex and relatively fragile hilt. These swords were exclusive to Chieftains and the great warriors in their service. The hilts were elaborately mounted with precious stones set in gold, and other lavish embellishments, that perhaps contained religious significance. By the end of the age these beautifully constructed, but ungainly, swords had been replaced by swords with better blades and stronger hilts. The point-heavy blades of the great migration gave way to sleeker tapered blades that featured improved handling characteristics.

Measurements and Specifications: Read more


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DANISH BATTLE AXE Weight: 2.9 kg -Head: 31cm x 25.2 cm -Length: 91cm -Sharp

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Confederate Staff Officer's Sabre

At 38" Overall Length, this impressive saber sports a beautifully etched curved blade, imprinted with "C.S." for Confederate States. Theses letters also form part of the brass guard. It has a black leather handle with gold wire trim. The metal scabbard has a black enamel finish with gold accents. This design was used by both sides during the war, with French influence in the etching and ornate basket.

 A great sword for your collection, or as a retirement gift, display, or re-enactment piece. The blade is forged from high carbon (EN45) steel, and has been sharpened. The tang and blade are one piece going into the pommel, there is no weld. The hilt (basket) is solid brass (not plated alloy) and is of good thickness, rendering it an accurate copy of a sword meant for combat -that is to say, about twice the thickness of other reproduction swords of this type which I have inspected. Just like the original, the scabbard has two robust brass rings for fixture to a belt. These are also convenient for wall mounting; indeed, this fine sword would grace a wall of any home.

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Viking Axe Features & Specifications Length: 51 cm. Head: 14 x 14 cm. Weight: 0.64 kg. Where most swords in some way or another balance the thrust, cut and slice, an axe's primary method of attack is based on percussive cuts. The shape of an axe head will focus momentum into a fairly small area and could transfer the shock through the mail and padding that many fighters would have been wearing. Because of this, the balance of most axes will be much further forward than most swords, and this bearded axe certainly follows suit. It is easy for most people to assume that axes, due to their forward balance, are slow and clumsy. This replica is a very nice example that proves this image to be false. The weapon has far more versatility than one might gather from a casual glance. This weapon can be wielded comfortably and easily. The dominant hand can shift around to change techniques easily: In closer-in fighting, the dominant hand can shift further towards the head, allowing very fast strikes utilizing more of a "punching" type of hit, but at the expense of sacrificing some power. At a greater distance, the dominant hand can slide slightly further down the haft mid-swing, in the same way one would chop wood, to not only cover the extra distance but to add momentum for much more powerful strikes. I have often heard people claim that an axe is a purely offensive weapon. While it is unfortunate that there is very little surviving evidence to detail how an axe like this was used historically, a basic understanding Read more

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According to world renowned sword expert, K J Parker, Patton's sabre was light, slim, exceptionally ergonomic and well-balanced – in short, "more or less perfect, the best sword ever issued to an army." Despite the high praise, when it was issued, it was already militarily obsolete because modern warfare invariably did not allow the cavalry charges for which it was intended. According to Parker, "if it was ever drawn in anger, I can find no record of it." Still ceremonially used by the US Army, this sword represents the final evolution of a 4000 year-old history of battlefield swords. Indeed, its grip has more in common with a 20th century handgun than a classic sword. Despite its stated use as a sabre, it is a first-class fencing weapon. ' This sword was designed by Lieutenant George S. Patton Jr., Master of the Sword at Fort Riley, Kansas. (This was quite a while before he became General George S. Patton Jr., Master of Kicking Much Nazi Butt in Europe.) This straight sabre was primarily a thrusting weapon, used in full charge as a short lance. It has many simularities to the British 1908 cavalry sword (used at the famous Australian mounted charge of the 4th Light Horse Brigade at Beersheba ion 1917). ' This quality functional/sharp reproduction features a tempered high carbon steel blade, a steel guard just a touch lighter than the originals, checkered plastic grips (as per the originals), a single fuller, and a wood cloth-clad scabbard with steel fittings. ' length: 42" blade: 35 1/4" (sharp) Read more
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This unusual dagger is well executed, large and heavy. It combines the best features of a parrying dagger with a classic short sword. Think of it as a parrying dagger designed as a primary weapon.

The blade is 35cm long and it has a 13.3 cm wire-wrap grip. This wire-wrap (aside from being historically accurate and aesthetically pleasing) enables a secure hold on this weapon -more so than plain leather or wood. Weight wise, it's over three quarters of a kilo, which is ample for a powerful cut.   It is long enough that it handles like a short sword, and sword drills can be carried out with this weapon. The overall length is an impressive 53cm. The hilt is plenty long enough for a hand-and-a-half grip, although such handling is inappropriate for dagger combat, this extra length coupled with the spherical pommel, makes it well suited for pushing down upon: so it's ideal for the last stages of a pig hunt!

The POB is at the guard exactly, this makes it extremely well balanced for thrusting while maintaining an excellent ability for snap cuts. I estimate however that the COP is 2-4 inches from the tip. It is designed for long slicing cuts rather than for thrusting and quick flicking (though it can be used for that). Both edges are sharp. Overall this is a very well executed dagger and its robustness and power make it a deadly weapon. Comes with scabbard. Read more


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PROTECTOR OF THE RAJ! NEPALI KHUKURI (KUKRI) GENUINE! -FROM THE HIMALAYAS 0.968 KG IN SHEATH -0.759 KG OUT OF SHEATH 42 CM LONG, EXCLUDING CURVATURE SPINE (BACK OF BLADE) = 0.5 CM WIDE BRASS-TIPPED SCABBARD WITH BELT LOOP WILL FIT ON ANY BELT UP TO 8CM WIDE HAND FORGED -FULL TANG BLADE MADE IN NEPAL Far superior to any Kathmandu tourist shop souvenir, the weapon you see here is hand forged from a Himalayan workshop; made in the traditional manner for heavy duty tasks, -such as lopping off branches, slaughtering animals and (if need be) self defense. The design hasn't changed for centuries. What more can we say? It is the real McCoy: a functional battlefield quality weapon; a Himalayan survival tool from the shadow of Everest. After the Samurai sword, this is the most awesome bladed weapon to ever come out of Asia. Yours to own! The internet is flooded with cheap MADE IN CHINA Kukris, most of which are “kukris” in name only, but only the genuine article will fill the gap in your collection. This is no wall hanger, it's solid and built for war and work – you will be pleased! With the kukri’s origin going back to ancient times, the kukri is not only the national knife of Nepal but is also symbolic of the Gurkha soldier; a prized possession with which he has indelibly carved an identity for himself. The kukri (or khukuri) has been the weapon of choice for the Gurkhas of Nepal since the 16th century -most notably used by the famous Gorkhali Sainik of King Prithivi Narayan Shah. It's employed Read more

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THE HILLSIDE FORGE

(Warrawong NSW)

Proudly Presents its:

Large Late 15th Century Dagger

Measurements and Specifications:

Weight: 0.567Kg Overall length: 51.5cm Blade length: 34.5cm Blade width: 4.3cm Cross width: 12.2cm Grip  length 11cm Point of Balance (PoB): at crosshguard

 

This large dagger could serve as a short sword just as well, and may be an interesting option for persons of short stature. It is very agile and fast, and very easy to handle. The length makes it a close-combat weapon, good for stabbing and slashing. It has a nice "flick" to it, and tracks quickly.

The fit and finish is very good, with no rattling, gaps or any noticeable grind marks. The blade comes sharp. The brass pommel and the cross are cast in solid brass. The grip is ribbed with cord and covered with thin, black leather, providing a secure and comfortable hold: as is evident from the photos.  The tang is a threaded rod welded to a split stub tang: the weld being very well made. Considering the 10 mm diameter of the Read more


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